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Showing posts with label Security news. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Security news. Show all posts

Data Breach with millions of email addresses and passwords surfaced on the internet

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Professionally organized groups use systems to automatically try access data on various portals, from email providers to music services. The problem: Many users use passwords several times and rarely change them. So some of the credentials that Hunt encountered will probably still be up to date.
The case shows that users need to do something to protect their digital identity. So they should check regularly if their email address has been published in case of a data leak. The Hasso Plattner Institute offers the Identity Leak Checker - it uses data that hackers have published as in the current case.

Troy Hunt has also developed such a service: He operates the portal haveibeenpwned.com. He has already integrated the data from the most recent case into the database. If users enter their email address there, they will receive a message as to whether this was affected by one of the known incidents or not.

At the latest when your own e-mail address appears there, you should think about a new password and if possible a two-factor authentication, said Linus Neumann from the Chaos Computer Club of the German Press Agency. A password manager that manages the access data is also helpful ( you will find more tips here ).

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"The year is just two weeks old and it is the second time that we have alarming news," said Neumann in view of the online attack on nearly 1,000 politicians and celebrities, which had become public in early January. "There are no more excuses. Anyone who does not do anything for his safety acts negligently and takes a risk. "

Top 20 Passwords You Should Avoid Using Now | Secure Your Online Account

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20 Passwords You Should Avoid
Passwords are those codes that shield access to a huge amount of private information in our personal accounts. Choosing the Best password is vital when it comes to protecting all this data, so it is important to think more than twice before setting a password.Alway try your own password don't use password generator tools

The reality is that not all users do this, that is why they are more common than the due keys such as "1234" or dates of birth. Now, a cybersecurity company called SplashData has compiled the least secure passwords to confirm which ones we should not choose.

The 20 Worst Passwords of 2018 

After analyzing more than 5 million passwords filtered on the network, SplashData has been able to confirm that bad habits are slow to die. Although choosing such a simple password is a serious risk to your mobile, computer or access to Instagram, many users continue to use this type of code for fear of forgetting or laziness to think of a more complicated one.

This is how we arrived at the 20 worst passwords of 2018, compiled by SplashData in this link. The first posts do not disappoint and contain passwords like "123456" or "password". In addition, the top 20 has some surprise that we did not expect, such as "monkey" or "football".

1) 123456
2) password
3) 123456789
4) 12345678
5) 12345
6) 111111
7) 1234567
8) sunshine
9) qwerty
10) iloveyou
11) princess
12) admin
13) welcome
14) 66666
15) abc123
16) football
17) 123123
18) monkey
19) 654321
20)! @ # $% ^ & *

Although it is not among the 20 worst passwords, "Donald", the name of the president of the United States, appears as number 23 on the list. "I'm sorry, Mr. President, but this is not a false story: using your name or any common name as a password is a dangerous decision," said Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData.

Knowing the keys that we must avoid at all costs to keep all the passwords you use on the Internet safe is vital to protect all the information that we keep with them. Finally, there is only trust in the technology companies with which we work so that they also protect our privacy.

Facebook Bug Exposed Private Photos Of Millions users

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Facebook Bug Exposed Private Photos Of Millions users
A Bug in Facebook put without prior consent the photographs of up to 6.8 million users available to software developers, reported on Friday the social network on his blog.

The Bug, which has already been amended by the company's security officers, exposed the images for 12 days, between September 13 and 25 of the same month of 2018, said Facebook's director of engineers, Tomer Bar.

When a user allows an application to access their photos from the social network, this action is usually limited to the images published on their wall, but the Bug caused the developers of the applications to also have access to the images of Stories and Marketplace.

In addition, the snapshots that users had already uploaded to the social network were also affected, but they had not been published, that is, they were stored on Facebook servers but were not visible to the public.

"We feel that this has happened. At the beginning of next week, we will release tools so that developers can determine which users could have been affected by this Bug. We will work with them to eliminate the affected photographs. " the engineer pointed.

The Bug was spread among 1,500 applications built by 876 different developers, and Facebook ensured that all affected users will be notified by means of a notice in the social network.

Facebook Fails Again, Exposing Over 50 Million Users In Security Breach

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Facebook Fails Again, Exposing Over 50 Million Users In Security Breach

Facebook can’t seem to get out of its own way when it comes to security. The biggest security issue for the social network was the Cambridge Analytica fiasco that gave the company access to information on 87 million users. In June, Facebook had another security failure when private posts of 14 million users were shared publicly. Today we learn of yet another security breach that resulted in the theft of personal details on 50 million users.
Facebook Fails Again, Exposing Over 50 Million Users In Security Breach
Facebook became aware of the breach on the afternoon of Tuesday, September 25 and said that the attack took advantage of the Facebook code for "View As". The feature lets people see their profile as other users would see it, but an exploit that the attackers used allowed them to steal Facebook access tokens that could be used to take over accounts. Access tokens are likened to digital keys that keep people logged into Facebook to prevent them from having to enter a password each time they come to the site.

Facebook notes that it has already acted on the breach by fixing the vulnerability and has informed law enforcement about the attack. Tokens on the almost 50 million accounts known to have been affected were reset, and Facebook reset tokens for another 40 million accounts that had been used with "View As" in the last year. This means that about 90 million Facebook users will have to log in again the next time they visit the website.

The accounts that must log back in will have a notification at the top of the screen that explains what happened. Facebook is turning off the "View As" feature while a security review is performed. The social giant has also given insight into what exactly happened, saying that the attack exploited a "complex interaction of multiple issues in our code." These changes stemmed from a setting the social giant changed in July 2017 related to video uploading that just so happened to impact "View As."

The investigation into the breach is underway now, and Facebook notes that it hasn’t determined if the accounts were misused or if the information was accessed. Despite the breach and potential to access accounts, Facebook indicates no reason for people to reset passwords. Facebook also notes that you can log out of your account on all devices via the "Security and Login" section in settings.

Man-in-the-Disk attack leaves millions of Android phones vulnerable

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The man-in-the-disk attack leaves millions of Android phones vulnerable

Recently, our researchers came across a shortcoming in the way Android apps use storage resources. Careless use of External Storage by applications may open the door to an attack resulting in any number of undesired outcomes, such as silent installation of unrequested, potentially malicious, apps to the user’s phone, denial of service for legitimate apps, and even cause applications to crash, opening the door to possible code injection that would then run in the privileged context of the attacked application.

Dubbed Man-in-the-Disk, the attack takes advantage of the way Android apps utilize 'External Storage' system to store app-related data, which if tampered could result in code injection in the privileged context of the targeted application.
It should be noted that apps on the Android operating system can store its resources on the device in two locations—internal storage and external storage

How Android Man-in-the-Disk Attack Works?
Similar to the "man-in-the-middle" attack, the concept of "man-in-the-disk" (MitD) attack involves interception and manipulation of data being exchanged between external storage and an application, which if replaced with a carefully crafted derivative "would lead to harmful results."
researchers found that Xiaomi web browser downloads its latest version on the external storage of the device before installing the update. Since app fails to validate the integrity of the data, the app's legitimate update code can be replaced with a malicious one.
"Xiaomi Browser was found to be using the External Storage as a staging resource for application updates," the researchers said in a blog post.
"As a result, our team was able to carry out an attack by which the application’s update code was replaced, resulting in the installation of an alternative, undesired application instead of the legitimate update."
In this way, attackers can get a man-in-the-disk position, from where they can monitor data transferred between any other app on the user's smartphone and the external storage and overwrite it with their own malicious version in order to manipulate or crash them.

The attack can also be abused to install another malicious app in the background without the user's knowledge, which can eventually be used to escalate privileges and gain access to other parts of the Android device, like camera, microphone, contact list, and more.

Man-in-the-Disk Attack Video Demonstrations

Check Point researchers also managed to compromise files and crash Google Translate, Google Voice-to-Text, and Yandex Translate because those apps also failed to validate the integrity of data used from the Android's external storage.

Among the apps that Check Point researchers tested for this new MitD attack were Google Translate, Yandex Translate, Google Voice Typing, LG Application Manager, LG World, Google Text-to-Speech, and Xiaomi Browser. Google, which itself doesn't follow its security guidelines, acknowledged and fixed some affected applications and is in the process of fixing other vulnerable apps as well, Check Point said.

WhatsApp Vulnerability Lets Hacker Modify Group Chats to Spread Fake News

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What's new in WhatsApp Vulnerability Lets Hacker Modify Group Chats to Spread Fake News

A group of Security Reachers Found New Vulnerability in What's app Let's Hacker To Modify Group Chats To Spread Fake News.
Check Point Research, however, lately unveiled new vulnerabilities in the famous messaging application that ought to permit hazard actors to intercept and manipulate messages despatched in both non-public and group conversations, giving attackers immense power to create and spread misinformation from what shows up to be depended on sources.

Our crew located three viable strategies of the attack exploiting this vulnerability – all of which involve social engineering strategies to fool end-users. A hazard actor can:


  • Use the ‘quote’ function in a group dialog to alternate the identification of the sender, even if that person is now not a member of the group.
  • Alter the textual content of any individual else’s reply, essentially placing phrases in their mouth.
  • Send a private message to another crew participant that is disguised as a public message for all, so when the centered person responds, it’s visible to all of us in the conversation.

Following the procedure of Responsible Disclosure, Check Point Research knowledgeable WhatsApp of their findings. From Check Point Research’s view, we consider these vulnerabilities to be of the utmost significance and require attention.


WhatsApp Protocol Decryption Burp Tool

About WhatsApp Protocol Decryption Burp Tool

This extension allows you to view and manipulate the actual data that sent via WhatsApp.

First, you have to run the parser.py file (which is in helper dir).
Second, you have to add the file burpWhatsapp.py to your pursuit extensions.


Functionality Of WhatsApp Protocol Decryption Burp Tool


Decrypt incoming data, you have to paste the data as base64 to the extension ctrl+b
Encrypt incoming data, after you decrypt the data you can encrypt and put it back to burp by copy paste the base64 and ctrl+shift+b
Decrypt outgoing data, to decrypt outgoing data you have to take it from AesCbcEncrypt function in list format.
Encrypt outgoing data, after the extension encrypts the data back you have to put it back via the console.
you can use the following helper function to do that:

function str2unit8(str) {
  var buf = new ArrayBuffer(str.length);
  var bufView = new Uint8Array(buf);

  for (var i=0, strLen=str.length; i < strLen; i++) {
    bufView[i] = str[i];
  }
  return buf;
}

WhatsApp Vulnerability Lets Hacker Modify Group Chats to Spread Fake News Tools

The BurpExtension currently can decrypt and encrypt only the message related functionality, in order to add more function you have to map the protobuf and add it to our protobuf file.

Conclusion The advantages of the new WPA3 Wi-Fi standard that comes with full security.

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On Monday, the Wi-Fi Alliance has released a new wireless security standard, WPA3, that addresses all known vulnerabilities. Including protection against the current wireless outbreak. Especially serious attacks like KRACK.
WPA stands for Wi-Fi Protected Access, a standard designed to authenticate wireless devices using the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption protocol on all communications packets in the air. To prevent the hacker secretly sucking data open the middle.
But last year it was. Researchers have discovered vulnerabilities in the widely used WPA2 protocol. This attack is known as KRACK (Key Reinstallation). Attack), allowing attackers to change, decode, or control wireless traffic. Many manufacturers have patched this vulnerability. The owners of the standard Wi-Fi Alliance did not hesitate to accelerate the development to the new standard WPA3 to replace the WPA2 used for the previous 15 years, which WPA3 has updated the configuration. , And encryption. It is divided into two types. WPA3-Personal and WPA3-Enterprise For personal networks, organizations, as well as IoT networks.
Key features of WPA3 include Brute-Force protection or wildcat code sniping. The use of open communications or Handshake SAE (Simultaneous Authentication of Equals), which prevents the removal of keys that are later used to decrypt old data, For public networks, by encrypting individual user data, and supporting up to 192-bit complex encryption for highly sensitive networks. Government or industry.

In addition to the main protocols, New features like Wi-Fi Easy Connect, Pear-pair, or Open -Connect enable smart devices for home use. (Without the display screen) with the router. It will replace the Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) that is considered vulnerable. By simply scanning a QR code through a smartphone, the user can instantly connect the device.
WPA3 products are expected to come out later this year. However, WPA3 devices can still communicate with WPA2 compliant devices.

Chinese Hackers Find Over a Dozen Vulnerabilities in BMW Cars

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Chinese security researchers have discovered more than a dozen vulnerabilities in the onboard compute units of BMW cars, some of which can be exploited remotely to compromise a vehicle.

The security flaws have been discovered during a year-long security audit conducted by researchers from Keen Security Lab, a cybersecurity research unit of Chinese firm Tencent, between January 2017 and February 2018.

In March 2018, the team responsibly disclosed 14 different vulnerabilities directly to the BMW Group, which affects its vehicles since at least 2012.

These are the same group of researchers who have previously found multiple vulnerabilities in various in-car modules used by Tesla, that could have been exploited to achieve remote controls on a target car.

Now that BMW started rolling out patches for the vulnerabilities to car owners, the researchers have gone public with a 26-page technical report [PDF] describing their findings, though they avoided publishing some important technical details to prevent abuse.

The researchers said a full copy of their research is expected to appear sometime in early 2019, by which the BMW group entirely mitigates against the vulnerabilities.

The team of Chinese infosec researchers focused on three critical vehicular components—Infotainment System (or Head Unit), Telematics Control Unit (TCU or T-Box), and Central Gateway Module in several BMW models.
Here's the list of flaws uncovered by the researchers:
  • 8 flaws impact the internet-connected Infotainment System that plays music and media
  • 4 flaws affect the Telematics Control Unit (TCU) that provides telephony services, accident assistance services, and ability to lock/unlock the car doors remotely.
  • 2 flaws affect the Central Gateway Module that has been designed to receive diagnostic messages from the TCU and the infotainment unit and then transfer them to other Electronic Control Units (ECUs) on different CAN buses.

Exploiting these vulnerabilities could allow attackers to send arbitrary diagnostic messages to the target vehicle's engine control unit (ECU), which control electrical functions of the car, and to the CAN bus, which is the spinal cord of the vehicle.

This would eventually allow miscreants to take complete control over the operation of the affected vehicle to some extent.
Four flaws require a physical USB access or access to the ODB (On-board diagnostics) port, which means attackers need to be inside your vehicle to exploit them by plugging a malware-laden gadget into the USB port.

Another four vulnerabilities require physical or "indirect" physical access to the car.

However, six vulnerabilities can be exploited remotely to compromise vehicle functions, including one conducted over a short range via Bluetooth or over long range via cellular networks, even when the vehicle is being driven.

The team confirmed that the vulnerabilities existed in Head Unit would affect several BMW models, including BMW i Series, BMW X Series, BMW 3 Series, BMW 5 Series, BMW 7 Series.

However, researchers said the vulnerabilities uncovered in Telematics Control Unit (TCB) would affect "BMW models which equipped with this module produced from the year 2012."

BMW has confirmed the findings and already started rolling out over-the-air updates to fix some bugs in the TCU, but other flaws will need patches through the dealers, which is why the researchers have scheduled their full technical report to March 2019.

BMW also rewarded Keen Security Lab researchers with the first winner of the BMW Group Digitalization and IT Research Award, describing their research "by far the most comprehensive and complex testing ever conducted on BMW Group vehicles by a third party."

The Russian suspect program is affecting Internet users around the world, FBI

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The Russian suspect program is affecting Internet users around the world, FBI
The Russian suspect program is affecting Internet users around the world, FBI
The US Investigation Fund of the Federal Board of Information (FBI) has warned Internet users and consumers worldwide that a Russian malware program is moving viruses into computers through routers and is affecting the systems.

According to a New York Times report, the FBI announced that the malware mentioned is capable of blocking web traffic, data collection and closing the device completely.

According to the FBI, initially users and companies will reboot their routers connected to the Internet and then turn on after a while, the problem will be resolved temporarily.

On the other hand, users have also been instructed to upgrade Device Firmware and change passwords. According to experts, at least 5 million routers of 54 countries have been affected by this malware.
According to the report, the group known as the APT 28 and Fancy Bear is being told that it is controlled by the Russian Military Intelligence Agency.

According to the US and European intelligence agencies report, the same group hacked the data of the Democratic National Committee during the US Presidential election 2016.

Despacito YouTube music video hacked plus other Vevo clips

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Hacker hijacked Vevo's multiple YouTube accounts and deleted #Despacito song, the most-viewed YouTube video with over 5 billion views, as well as a few more popular songs.

Hacker hijacked Vevo's multiple YouTube accounts and deleted


Despacito YouTube music video hacked plus other Vevo clips
YouTube's music video for the hit song Despacito, which has had over five billion views, has been hacked.

More than a dozen other artists, including Shakira, Selena Gomez, Drake and Taylor Swift are also affected. The original clips had been posted by Vevo.

The Despacito video has been removed, but its cover image had shown a group wearing masks and pointing guns.

The hackers, calling themselves Prosox and Kuroi'sh, had written "Free Palestine" underneath the videos.

Several of the clips remain live at time of writing.


The actual video content itself remained unaltered. Many titles have been changed to include the names of the hackers, but only some feature the replaced cover image.

Mastermind Behind Cyber Gang’s $1 Billion Crime Spree Arrested In Spain

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Mastermind Behind Cyber Gang’s $1 Billion Crime Spree Arrested In Spain
Mastermind Behind Cyber Gang’s $1 Billion Crime Spree Arrested In Spain
Europol, the pan European police agency has said they’ve apprehended the brain behind the thefts after a lengthy investigation.

Arrested in Alicante, a popular holiday destination in Spain, the leader of the digital crime gang is allegedly responsible for creating and deploying the Carbanak and Cobalt malware that targeted over 100 financial institutions worldwide.


Joint operation
The investigation was a joint operation conducted jointly between several police forces and law enforcement agencies including the Spanish police (perhaps somewhat obviously), Europol, FBI, the Romanian, Moldovan, Belarussian and Taiwanese authorities and a multitude of privately owned cybersecurity companies.

“The arrest of the key figure in this crime group illustrates that cyber-criminals can no longer hide behind perceived international anonymity,” said Steven Wilson, head of Europol’s Cyber-Crime Centre. “The arrest of the key figure in this crime group illustrates that cyber-criminals can no longer hide behind perceived international anonymity. This is another example where the close cooperation between law enforcement agencies on a worldwide scale and trusted private sector partners is having a major impact on top-level cyber criminality.”



Spear phishing
The cybercrime gang have been in operation since 2013 and have hacked banks, ATMs, e-payment systems and various other financial institutions using ingenious pieces of malware they designed themselves, known as Carbanak and Cobalt. Despite the sophistication of the malware used, however, a large part of what allowed them to infiltrate the institutions they would later rob, was gained through ‘spear phishing’ attempts specifically targeted at employees in order to get them to divulge confidential information.

In conjunction with this knowledge, the thieves then siphoned off cash either through bank transfers and e-payments or were dispensed automatically through cash machines.

Big bucks
The thieves are alleged to have stolen over $1 billion in the five years they were operating. The Cobalt malware meant that $10 million was stolen in one heist.

Microsoft's Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More vulnerable

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Microsoft's Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More vulnerable
Microsoft's Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More vulnerable
For those unaware, Spectre and Meltdown were security flaws disclosed by researchers earlier this year in processors from Intel, ARM, and AMD, leaving nearly every PC, server, and mobile phone on the planet vulnerable to data theft.

Shortly after the researchers disclosed the Spectre and Meltdown exploits, software vendors, including Microsoft, started releasing patches for their systems running a vulnerable version of processors.

However, an independent Swedish security researcher Ulf Frisk found that Microsoft's security fixes to Windows 7 PCs for the Meltdown flaw—which could allow attackers to read kernel memory at a speed of 120 KBps—is now allowing attackers to read the same kernel memory at a speed of Gbps, making the issue even worse on Windows 7 PCs and Server 2008 R2 boxes.

Frisk is the same researcher who previously discovered a way to steal the password from virtually any Mac laptop in just 30 sec by exploiting flaws in Apple's FileVault disk encryption system, allowing attackers to unlock any Mac system and even decrypt files on its hard drive.

The discovery is the latest issue surrounding Meltdown and Spectre patches that were sometimes found incomplete and sometimes broken, making problems such as spontaneous reboots and other 'unpredictable' system behavior on affected PCs.

According to Frisk, the problem with MS' early Meltdown fixes occurs due to a single bit (that controls the permission to access kernel memory) accidentally being flipped from supervisor-only to any-user in a virtual-to-physical-memory translator called PLM4, allowing any user-mode application to access the kernel page tables.

The PML4 is the base of the 4-level in-memory page table hierarchy that Intel's CPU Memory Management Unit (MMU) uses to translate the virtual memory addresses of a process into physical memory addresses in RAM.

The correctly set bit normally ensures the kernel has exclusive access to these tables.
"The User/Supervisor permission bit was set to User in the PML4 self-referencing entry. This made the page tables available to user mode code in every process. The page tables should normally only be accessible by the kernel itself," Frisk explains in his blog post.
To prove his claim, Frisk also provided a detailed breakdown and a proof-of-concept exploit. The issue only affects 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, and not Windows 10 or Windows 8.1 PCs, as they still require attackers to have physical access to a targeted system.

Buggy Patch Allows to Read Gigabytes of Data In a Second

Also since the PML4 page table has been located at a fixed memory address in Windows 7, "no fancy exploits" are needed to exploit the Meltdown vulnerability.
"Windows 7 already did the hard work of mapping in the required memory into every running process," Frisk said. "Exploitation was just a matter of reading and write to already mapped in-process virtual memory. No fancy APIs or syscalls required - just standard read and write!"
Once read/write access has been gained to the page tables, it would be "trivially easy" to gain access to the entire physical memory, "unless it is additionally protected by Extended Page Tables (EPTs) used for Virtualization," Frisk said.

All attackers have to do is to write their own Page Table Entries (PTEs) into the page tables in order to access arbitrary physical memory.

Frisk said he has not been able to link the new vulnerability to anything on the public list of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. He also invited researchers to test the flaw using an exploit kit he released on GitHub.

UPDATE: Microsoft Releases Emergency Patch
In the wake of the researcher's finding, Microsoft released an emergency patch on Thursday for the vulnerability (CVE-2018-1038) introduced as a Meltdown patch issued by the company earlier this year.

The out-of-band security update for Microsoft Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 "addresses an elevation of privilege vulnerability in the Windows kernel in the 64-Bit (x64) version of Windows."

According to the Microsoft advisory, the elevation of privilege flaw occurs when the Windows kernel fails to handle objects in memory properly. Successfully exploitation of this flaw could allow an attacker to run arbitrary code in kernel mode.

"An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights," the advisory states.

No other Windows OS version is impacted, except Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (x64) and Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (x64).

So all admins and users of Windows 7 and Windows 2008R2 are strongly recommended to update their systems as soon as possible.

Data leaks Facebook Head Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged the mistake

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Facebook's head Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged his mistake regarding leaking consumer data, saying that he would restore the trust of the customers.
Data leaks Facebook Head Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged the mistake
Data leaks Facebook Head Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged the mistake

Mark Zuckerberg said in his Facebook message that he stumbled in the case of Data Company Cambridge Antartica and should not have believed in the company at 2015 at the time when Cambridge Antarctica was told that Facebook users were safe. The data will be deleted.Mark Zuckerberg said that all the applications will be investigated that were available before 2014.Along with that,

 he said that more security measures will be taken after the Cambridge Antartica scandal and the consumer confidence will be restored.Mark Zuckerberg said he was ready to explain in front of the American Congress too.In his message, Mark Zuckerberg wrote that 'I am the founder of Facebook and I am responsible for whatever happens to this platform'.He further wrote that he is serious to secure this community and after this experience of Cambridge Antalya, he will try to avoid such incidents.

How do Facebook users use personal data?
It is clear that the recent report states that British Election Consultancy firm, Cambridge Anatetica, used personal information from millions of Facebook users to use it to influence the elections in different countries around the world.

In this context, the British and European institutions are investigating against Facebook and Cambridge Antalya that in 2016, to make possible the Trump's success in US presidential election and the UK 'Union' Referendum to make a 'break' Media users' data was stolen and the results were affected.
In this regard, any misconduct has been denied by both the companies.

Best Hacking Tools Of 2018 For Windows, Linux, And OS X

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Best Hacking Tools
ithubpk has collected a useful list of the best hacking tools of 2018 based upon industry reviews, your feedback, and its own experience. This list will tell you about the best software used for hacking purposes featuring port scanners, web vulnerability scanner, password crackers, forensics tools and social engineering tools.

We have compiled this list of top hacking tools of 2018 with their best features and download links. Read about them, learn how to use them and share your reviews to make this list better.

Note: ithubpk is publishing this article just for educational purposes and we don’t promote malicious practices.


1. Metasploit | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018

Metasploit a collection of exploit tools, I’ll call it an infrastructure that you can utilize to build your own custom tools. This free tool is one of the most popular cybersecurity tool around that allows you to locate vulnerabilities at different platforms. Metasploit is backed by more than 200,000 users and contributors that help you to get insights and uncover the weaknesses in your system.

This top hacking tool package of 2017 lets you simulate real-world attacks to tell you about the weak points and finds them. As a penetration tester, it pin points the vulnerabilities with Nexpose closed–loop integration using Top Remediation reports. Using the open source Metasploit framework, users can build their own tools and take the best out of this multi-purpose hacking tool.

Supported platforms and download:
Metasploit is available for all major platforms including Windows, Linux, and OS X.


2. Acunetix WVS | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018


Acunetix is a web vulnerability scanner (WVS) that scans and finds out the flaws in a website that could prove fatal. This multi-threaded tool crawls a website and finds out malicious Cross-site Scripting, SQL injection, and other vulnerabilities. This fast and easy to use tool scans WordPress websites from more than 1200 vulnerabilities in WordPress.
ethical-hacking-course-square-ad
Acunetix comes with a Login Sequence Recorder that allows one to access the password protected areas of websites. The new AcuSensor technology used in this tool allows you to reduce the false positive rate. Such features have made Acunetix WVS a preferred hacking tools that you need to check out in 2018

Supported platforms and download:
Acunetix is available for Windows XP and higher.

3. Nmap | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018


Nmap – also known as Network Mapper – falls in the category of a port scanner tool. This free and open source hacking tool is the most popular port scanning tool around that allows efficient network discovery and security auditing. Used for a wide range of services, Nmap uses raw IP packets to determine the hosts available on a network, their services along with details, operating systems used by hosts, the type of firewall used, and other information.

Last year, Nmap won multiple security products of the year awards and was featured in multiple movies including The Matrix Reloaded, Die Hard 4, and others.  Available in the command line, Nmap executable also comes in an advanced GUI avatar.

Supported platforms and download:
Nmap is available for all major platforms including Windows, Linux, and OS X.

4. Wireshark | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018


Wireshark is a well-known packet crafting tool that discovers vulnerability within a network and probes firewall rule-sets. Used by thousands of security professionals to analyze networks and live pocket capturing and deep scanning of hundreds of protocols. Wireshark helps you to read live data from Ethernet, IEEE 802.11, PPP/HDLC, ATM, Bluetooth, USB, Token Ring, Frame Relay, FDDI, and others.

This free and open source tool was originally named Ethereal. Wireshark also comes in a command-line version called TShark.

Supported platforms and download:
This GTK+-based network protocol analyzer runs with ease on Linux, Windows, and OS X.


5. oclHashcat | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018

If password cracking is something you do on daily basis, you might be aware of the free password cracking tool Hashcat. While Hashcat is a CPU-based password cracking tool, oclHashcat is its advanced version that uses the power of your GPU.

oclHashcat calls itself world’s fastest password cracking tool with world’s first and only GPGPU based engine. For using the tool, NVIDIA users require ForceWare 346.59 or later and AMD users require Catalyst 15.7 or later.

This tool employs following attack modes for cracking:

Straight
Combination
Brute-force
Hybrid dictionary + mask
Hybrid mask + dictionary
Mentioning another major feature, oclHashcat is an open source tool under MIT license that allows an easy integration or packaging of the common Linux distros.

Supported platforms and download:
This useful password cracking tool can be downloaded in different versions for Linux, OSX, and Windows.

6. Nessus Vulnerability Scanner | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018

This top free security tool of 2018 works with the help of a client-server framework. Developed by Tenable Network Security, the tool is one of the most popular vulnerability scanners we have. Nessus serves different purposes to different types of users – Nessus Home, Nessus Professional, Nessus Manager and Nessus Cloud.

Using Nessus, one can scan multiple types of vulnerabilities that include remote access flaw detection, misconfiguration alert, denial of services against TCP/IP stack, preparation of PCI DSS audits, malware detection, sensitive data searches etc. To launch a dictionary attack, Nessus can also call a popular tool Hydra externally.

Apart from the above mentioned basic functionalities, Nessus could be used to scan multiple networks on IPv4, IPv6, and hybrid networks. You can set scheduled scan to run at your chosen time and re-scan all or a subsection of previously scanned hosts using selective host re-scanning.

Supported platforms and download:
Nessus is supported by a variety of platforms including Windows 7 and 8, Mac OS X, and popular Linux distros like Debian, Ubuntu, Kali Linux etc.


7. Maltego | Best Hacking Tools Of 2018


Maltego is an open source forensics platform that offers rigorous mining and information gathering to paint a picture of cyber threats around you. Maltego excels in showing the complexity and severity of points of failure in your infrastructure and the surrounding environment.

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Maltego is a great hacker tool that analyzes the real world links between people, companies, websites, domains, DNS names, IP addresses, documents and whatnot. Based on Java, this tool runs in an easy-to-use graphical interface with lost customization options while scanning.

Supported platforms and download:
Maltego security tool is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

8. Social-Engineer Toolkit | Best Hacking Tools Of 2017


Also featured on Mr. Robot, TrustedSec’s Social-Engineer Toolkit is an advanced framework for simulating multiple types of social engineering attacks like credential harvestings, phishing attacks, and more. On the show, Elliot is seen using the SMS spoofing tool from the Social-Engineer Toolkit.

This Python-driven tool is the standard tool for social engineering penetration tests with more than two million downloads. It automates the attacks and generates disguising emails, malicious web pages and more.

Supported platforms and download:
To download SET on Linux, type the following command:

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git clone https://github.com/trustedsec/social-engineer-toolkit/ set/
Apart from Linux, Social-Engineer Toolkit is partially supported on Mac OS X and Windows.

15-Year-Old Schoolboy Posed as CIA Chief to Hack Highly Sensitive Information

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Remember "Crackas With Attitude"?

A notorious pro-Palestinian hacking group behind a series of embarrassing hacks against United States intelligence officials and leaked the personal details of 20,000 FBI agents, 9,000 Department of Homeland Security officers, and some number of DoJ staffers in 2015.

Believe or not, the leader of this hacking group was just 15-years-old when he used "social engineering" to impersonate CIA director and unauthorisedly access highly sensitive information from his Leicestershire home, revealed during a court hearing on Tuesday.

Kane Gamble, now 18-year-old, the British teenager hacker targeted then CIA director John Brennan, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, FBI deputy director Mark Giuliano, as well as other senior FBI figures.

Between June 2015 and February 2016, Gamble posed as Brennan and tricked call centre and helpline staff into giving away broadband and cable passwords, using which the team also gained access to plans for intelligence operations in Afghanistan and Iran.

The teenager also taunted his victims and their families, released their personal details, bombarded them with calls and messages, downloaded and installed pornography onto their computers and took control of their iPads and TV screens.

He also made hoax calls to Brennan's home and took control of his wife’s iPad.

At one point, Gamble also sent DHS secretary Johnson a photograph of his daughter and said he would f*** her, phoned his wife, leaving a voicemail message which said: "Hi Spooky, am I scaring you?," and even managed to get the message "I own you" on the couple's home television.

Gamble was arrested in February 2016 at his council home in Coalville and last October he pleaded guilty to 8 charges of "performing a function with intent to secure unauthorised access" and 2 charges of "unauthorised modification of computer material."

Gamble said he targeted the US government because he was "getting more and more annoyed about how corrupt and cold-blooded the US Government" was and "decided to do something about it."

Gamble's defence said he was technically gifted but emotionally immature and has an autistic spectrum disorder, at the time of his offending, he had the mental development of a 12 or 13-year-old.

Also, the defence said, at no point did Gamble attempt to profit from his actions.

Out of 10 counts, Gamble previously admitted 8 charges of performing a function with intent to secure unauthorised access.

The teenager will be sentenced when the hearing resumes at a later date.

Two other members of Crackas With Attitude hacking group, Andrew Otto Boggs and Justin Gray Liverman, were arrested by FBI in September 2016 and had already been sentenced to five years in federal prison.

MADIoT – The nightmare after XMAS (and Meltdown, and Spectre)

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Lots has been written about these vulnerabilities already: if you are new to the subject we suggest that you read Aryeh Goretsky’s article “Meltdown and Spectre CPU Vulnerabilities: What You Need to Know.”

Now, there is a much larger underlying issue. Yes, software bugs happen, hardware bugs happen. The first are usually fixed by patching the software; in most cases the latter are fixed by updating the firmware. However, that is not possible with these two vulnerabilities as they are caused by a design flaw in the hardware architecture, only fixable by replacing the actual hardware.

Luckily, with cooperation between the suppliers of modern operating systems and the hardware vendors responsible for the affected CPUs, the Operating Systems can be patched, and complemented if necessary with additional firmware updates for the hardware. Additional defensive layers preventing malicious code from exploiting the holes – or at least making it much harder – are an “easy” way to make your desktop, laptop, tablet and smartphone devices (more) secure. Sometimes this happens at the penalty of a slowdown in device performance, but there’s more to security than obscurity and sometimes you just have to suck it up and live with the performance penalty. To be secure, the only other option is either to replace the faulty hardware (in this case, there is no replacement yet) or to disconnect the device from the network, never to connect it again (nowadays not desirable or practical).

And that is exactly where the problems begin. CPUs made by AMD, ARM, Intel, and probably others, are affected by these vulnerabilities: specifically, ARM CPUs are used in a lot of IoT devices, and those are devices that everybody has, but they forget they have them once they are operating, and this leaves a giant gap for cybercriminals to exploit. According to ARM, they are already “securing” a Trillion (1,000,000,000,000) devices. Granted, not all ARM CPUs are affected, but if even 0.1% of them are, it still means a Billion (1,000,000,000) affected devices.

IoT of issues

Now I can hear already someone say “What kind of sensitive data can be stolen from my Wi-Fi-controlled light? Or my refrigerator? Or from my digital photo frame? Or from my Smart TV?” The answer is simple: lots. Think about your Wi-Fi password (which would make it possible for anyone to get onto your local network), your photos (luckily you only put the decent photos on the digital photo frame in your living room, right? Or did you configure it to connect automatically to Instagram or DropBox to fetch your newly-taken pictures?), your credentials to Netflix? Your… Eh… There is a lot of information people nowadays store on IoT devices.

Ok, to be fair, to get access to these IoT devices, your attackers need to have compromised the network already to get into them? Or they have to compromise the supply chain, or compromise apps or widgets that can run on the device, or… as you can see, there are many ways to get access to these devices.

It is not feasible, in fact not even possible, to replace all CPUs in all devices. It would be too costly, besides the success rate for unsoldering and resoldering pin-throughs in multi-layer boards will never be 100%. In the real world, people will keep their existing devices until those devices reach the end of their lifecycles. So for years to come, people will have households with vulnerable devices.

Do you know how many IoT devices you have on your local network? Probably not. Several products, including from ESET, exist that will identify all the network-aware devices in your network. If you use any of these you may be surprised  you discover some devices you have never realized are there in your household at all.
As mentioned, it would be too costly to replace all the faulty CPUs, especially in the cheaper IoT devices. On those, even updating the firmware or (patching) the operating system may not be possible. As a warning, when you are buying a new IoT device, it makes sense to check which CPU it is running on, and if that CPU is affected by these vulnerabilities. It is expected that some devices may suddenly be offered cheaply by the manufacturer, hoping to rid their inventory of old(er) faulty CPUs while manufacturing new devices with updated CPUs, when these become available. So: caveat emptor. A bargain may turn out to be a nightmare once you connect it to your network.
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BEWARE: Hackers Infect Facebook Messenger With Virus That Mines Cryptocurrency

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The malware was first discovered in South Korea and since its discovery, it has paved its way into Thailand, Vietnam, Venezuela, Azerbaijan, Philippines, and Ukraine. If people aren’t cautious, Digmine could soon reach other countries.


Researchers at Cybersecurity firm Trend Micro have warned that hackers are using Facebook Messenger to infect computers with “Digmine”, a virus that turns victims’ computers into a cryptocurrency miner without their knowledge.

What is Digmine?
Digimine only works when it is spread via the desktop version of the app on Google Chrome. If the app is accessed on any another platform, such as a mobile phone, Digmine won’t function. But Trend Micro warns it can still be considered very dangerous as it can let hackers take over users’ Facebook accounts and slow their computer down. Trend Mirco explains:

“Digmine is coded in AutoIt, and sent to would-be victims posing as a video file but is actually an AutoIt executable script. If the user’s Facebook account is set to log in automatically, Digmine will manipulate Facebook Messenger in order to send a link to the file to the account’s friends.

“The abuse of Facebook is limited to propagation for now, but it wouldn’t be implausible for attackers to hijack the Facebook account itself down the line. This functionality’s code is pushed from the command-and-control (C&C) server, which means it can be updated.”


The Infection

Once installed on the victim’s computer, the Digmine script file downloads more components from the control server. It saves the downloaded components in the %appdata%\<username> directory.

Once rooted in the system, Digmine will edit the registry, giving itself the auto-start access, and download a malicious extension on Chrome. The malicious browser extension is responsible for propagation via interaction with Chrome, and by extension, Facebook Messenger.

After Trend Micro revealed its findings, Facebook claims to have taken down any links connected to Digmine:

“We maintain a number of automated systems to help stop harmful links and files from appearing on Facebook and in Messenger. If we suspect your computer is infected with malware, we will provide you with a free anti-virus scan from our trusted partners.”

How to Protect Yourself
In order to keep yourself protected from Digmine, follow the best safety practices recommended by security experts. For instance, always log out of your accounts, even if it is your personal computer. Use passwords that have a combination of letter, numbers and symbols.

Make sure these passwords are not dictionary words. Also, use two-factor authentication. Meanwhile, install a link scanning extension on your browser that will warn you of a malicious link.

Edward Snowden Warns: Whatever You Do, Don't Use Telegram Messenger App

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Ex-NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has raised further awareness of the risks encountered when using messaging applications. In the past, Snowden has been critical of Skype, where the company gave over Skype chats to the NSA.
In his latest round of Tweets, Snowden has questioned the Telegram app, in the context of the current Iranian political unrest. In his first tweet, he wondered why Telegram is claiming to provide secure services when in fact its public channels are censorable and unsafe.
He then goes on to talk about the questions surrounding the use of Telegram, and how the channel works.

Over 40 million people in Iran use the Telegram app. Snowden says “public channels” are important news sources for Iranians who lack the tech skills that would otherwise keep them safe from prying Big Brother eyes. However, those currently using the app are unsafe and can easily be tracked by the Iranian government for political advantages.
Just prior to New Years Eve, Telegram had shut down a channel that was calling for “violent protests” against the Iranian government. Iranian telecom minister Mohammad-Javad Azari Jahromi, known on Twitter as MJ Azari, had tweeted just before its shutdown that Telegram was “encouraging hateful conduct” and social unrest. In his tweet, he encouraged Telegram to stop the behaviour.
Telegram CEO Pavel Durov responded, supporting Jahromi, saying if proven, the channel will be blocked regardless of its political affiliation. Two hours later, the CEO gave a suspension order.
Edward Snowden questioned the CEO’s decision saying that Telegram’s move was akin to a “monopoly position” to keep its “ecosystem” alive.

Snowden reminded Durov of what forced him from Russia, when Russian domestic intelligence (FSB) attacked the app in September. At the time, Durov received a letter from the FSB, which he published on the Russian equivalent to Facebook that he also founded but no longer controls. The letter stated that Russian law dictates all keys be handed over to the government for decryption of any communications transmitted over Telegram.
In Iran, due to the distrust of American messaging apps, Telegram is one of the most downloaded apps on Android. For Iranians, a Russian connection is safer than Mark Zuckerberg’s offer. But Snowden warned Telegram is less safe than WhatsApp because of its storage based in the cloud, allowing third party access.
He advised Telegram’s Durov to design features that will remain accessible even if blocked by authoritarian regimes. He encouraged the conversion of all Iranian Telegram accounts to two-factor authentication and to teach the users to engage with Tor bridges as another form of protection.
He based his suggestions on the acknowledgment of governments becoming more authoritarian in their reach over users on messaging apps and the Internet. Naming Russia, China and Iran as some of the more overreaching governments, Snowden recommended using Signal, an encrypted messaging app he says he uses every day.

Protect Your Devices Against Meltdown and Spectre Attacks

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The vulnerabilities allow an attacker to compromise the privileged memory of a processor by exploiting the way processes run in parallel. They also allow an attacker to use JavaScript code running in a browser to access memory in the attacker’s process. That memory content could contain key strokes, passwords, and other valuable information. Researchers are already showing how easy this attack works on Linux machines, but Microsoft says it has “not received any information to indicate that these vulnerabilities have been used to attack customers at this time.”

Here is Simple Guide To Protect Your Devices Against Meltdown and Spectre Attacks

How to Update Your Devices
To keep your Apple products secure and protected from the Meltdown flaw exploiting the way processors optimize performance, make sure you’re updated your devices accordingly.

macOS: Ensure your Mac is up to date by hitting the apple in the top left of your menu, selecting About This Mac, and checking if your version number reads macOS 10.13.2 or greater. If not, just hit the Software Update button below the summary of your Mac’s system information.


iOS: Update your iOS device to iOS 11.2 by visiting your Settings > General > Software Update. Ensure your iOS device has a 50% charge (or is plugged in) before updating to reduce the risk of running out of juice during an update.

Apple TV: You can update your Apple TV to tvOS 11.2. Visit Settings > System > Software Updates to check if you’re up to date, and follow Apple’s instructions on updating older Apple TV devices.

Apple Watch: Apple says your Apple Watch isn’t affected by the flaw, so you can rest easy on that front.

Spectre Updates are Coming Soon
While the Spectre flaw is more difficult to protect against, Apple says it will be updating its Safari browser to protect users from particular exploit techniques on macOS and iOS. tvOS and watchOS will receive updates as Apple tests methods to protect its products from the Spectre security flaw.

Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) — What You Need to Know

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Malware is evolving. As noted by Tech Republic, new strains such as fileless malware — which as the name suggests don’t use typical payloads but instead leverage trusted process such as PowerShell to gain system access — are ten times more likely to succeed than their file- dependent counterparts. According to Beta News, meanwhile, evolving strains of mobile malware have been so successful that 100 percent of enterprises have suffered mobile attacks.

The result? Existing anti-virus and anti-malware tools aren’t enough on their own. Companies need the help of trained IT experts to predict new attack vectors, create new defenses and develop new strategies to stay one step ahead of cybercriminals. For IT pros, the journey from front-line support to attack mitigation expert starts with accredited training: The Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) course.



According to Beta News, meanwhile, evolving strains of mobile malware have been so successful that 100 percent of enterprises have suffered mobile attacks. The result? Existing anti-virus and anti-malware tools aren’t enough on their own. Companies need the help of trained IT experts to predict new attack vectors, create new defenses and develop new strategies to stay one step ahead of cybercriminals. For IT pros, the journey from front-line support to attack mitigation expert starts with accredited training: The Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) course.

Out-Hacking the Hackers

Why CEH? Why should the “good guys” learn to think and act like the attackers they’re trying to stop? It’s simple: Companies need to get proactive. Consider a typical attack scenario. Hackers leverage fileless malware to infect one enterprise device, then move laterally across the network to compromise multiple endpoints. The final step? Encrypted files and ransomware demands, forcing businesses to choose between spending big to save their data or standing firm and risking damage to their reputation. And where are security experts in this scenario? They’re responding to threats as they occur, trying to mitigate damage while they search for indicators of another attack.

CEH gives IT professionals the tools they need to change the game. Instead of reacting to attacks that have already occurred, CEH training teaches technology experts to think like hackers, to analyze existing security controls and procedures the way attackers approach prospective targets — looking for undetected weaknesses and exploitable strengths.

Certified ethical hacking offers three key benefits:

Proactive Posture — Understanding how hackers think and knowing which tools they prefer to use helps infosec pros create security policies which defend against both current and emerging threats.
Better Testing — Why wait for hackers to breach the network? CEH training gives IT pros the skills they need to conduct thorough penetration testing on enterprise networks and discover potential weaknesses before hackers do the same.

Improved Training — The best defense against cyber attacks? Preparation. Thanks to hands-on labs and challenges during the CEH course, technology experts gain the knowledge they need to create realistic, adaptable attack scenarios, then test existing security policies and employee preparedness.
Certification and Ongoing Requirements

As noted by CSO Online, the EC-Council’s CEH course is both the oldest and most popular ethical hacking course, and for good reason — it includes 18 subject domains on both traditional hacking methods and emerging vectors such as wireless and cloud platforms along with hands-on training. The course is designed for IT pros with several years of real-world experience, and successful outcomes are improved with the addition of comprehensive study tools.

Also worth noting? All EC-Council certifications are now valid for three years from the date of certification. Re-certification requires enrollment in the EC-Council Continuing Education (ECE) program — students must complete at least 120 credits of relevant coursework after which their CEH certification will be extended three years from the month of expiry.

 Reactive security is no longer enough to safeguard critical network assets; CEH designations give IT professionals the ability to proactively defend against new threat vectors, anticipate hackers’ next line of attack and develop improved infosec processes. training teaches technology experts to think like hackers, to analyze existing security controls and procedures the way attackers approach prospective targets — looking for undetected weaknesses and exploitable strengths.

Certified ethical hacking offers three key benefits:

Proactive Posture — Understanding how hackers think and knowing which tools they prefer to use helps infosec pros create security policies which defend against both current and emerging threats.
Better Testing — Why wait for hackers to breach the network? CEH training gives IT pros the skills they need to conduct thorough penetration testing on enterprise networks and discover potential weaknesses before hackers do the same.

Improved Training — The best defense against cyber attacks? Preparation. Thanks to hands-on labs and challenges during the CEH course, technology experts gain the knowledge they need to create realistic, adaptable attack scenarios, then test existing security policies and employee preparedness.
Certification and Ongoing Requirements

As noted by CSO Online, the EC-Council’s CEH course is both the oldest and most popular ethical hacking course, and for good reason — it includes 18 subject domains on both traditional hacking methods and emerging vectors such as wireless and cloud platforms along with hands-on training. The course is designed for IT pros with several years of real-world experience, and successful outcomes are improved with the addition of comprehensive study tools.

Also worth noting? All EC-Council certifications are now valid for three years from the date of certification. Re-certification requires enrollment in the EC-Council Continuing Education (ECE) program — students must complete at least 120 credits of relevant coursework after which their CEH certification will be extended three years from the month of expiry. Reactive security is no longer enough to safeguard critical network assets; CEH designations give IT professionals the ability to proactively defend against new threat vectors, anticipate hackers’ next line of attack and develop improved infosec processes.